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I am an advocate for rare names. You may not find Amy or Aidan on this page, but you'll find Amarantha and Albion. I believe in doing thorough research on each name posted, and am currently working on updating the facts in my earlier entries, some of which go back to 2011. This is a name-by-name style site, but if you're looking for something more comprehensive I suggest K. M. Sheard's Complete Book of Names and a stroll through www.behindthename.com and nancy.cc. I recommend parents avoid any books with titles including large numbers, such as "20,000 Baby Names," or grand claims such as "All the Best Baby Names," as they usually lack research, etymologies, or historical details.

Email: rarebabynames@yahoo. com

Facebook: Once Upon a Time Baby Names

Twitter: @onceaname

Get to know me on Instagram, I'm cosmicsailoronstardust

Request names, lists, character or baby naming advice in the comment section below. No unusual name will be rejected as long as it has sufficient data. Request name consultations by email and a list will be made for you, which you may chose to keep private.

Comments

  1. Love the new look site and your choice of name :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks so much for offering an e-mail subscription service - very much appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Your site is fantastic. Thank you for dedicating a blog to fairytale names. My first baby is due on Valentine's day. I'm a fairytale illustrator so your site is a gift. I love how ,ugh detail you go into when introducing a name. Sometimes I'm not fond of the name but the history of it is too intriguing not to read.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Do you take requests? If so, would you consider Ermintrude?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I sent you an email ��

      Delete
  5. Hi Rarebabyname Team,

    My name is Anuj Agarwal. I'm Founder of Feedspot.

    I would like to personally congratulate you as your blog Once Upon a Time Baby Names has been selected by our panelist as one of the Top 40 Baby Name Blogs on the web.

    http://blog.feedspot.com/baby_names_blogs/

    I personally give you a high-five and want to thank you for your contribution to this world. This is the most comprehensive list of Top 40 Baby Name Blogs on the internet and I’m honored to have you as part of this!

    Also, you have the honor of displaying the badge on your blog.

    Best,
    Anuj

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hello, I am requesting information on the names Jachin and Lech, specifically, is Jachin related to Joachim and are there any feminine versions of Lech?
    Thank you kindly!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jachin is Tiberian Hebrew meaning "He will establish." It seems to be unrelated to Joachim. Lech, which is said to be pronounced LEX, is a Polish name with lots of historical namesakes. It comes from the Slavic tribe name of the Lendians, likely meaning "from the fields." Leche might be a female variant, likely pronounced LEX-eh.

      Delete

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Witchy Baby Girl Names!

Circe Invidiosa by John William Waterhouse
Have a little girl due in October? Looking to name a character? Here's my [seemingly endless] list of witchy-sounding baby names. Most of them also fit in the "clunky but cool" category, or "vintage." Most plants, trees, herbs, spices, flowers, gems, space and nature names fit the bill, because in stories and current practice these things are useful to witches. I've put any actual witch names from legend, myth, literature, movies, etc in bold and up front. I have not considered the names of actual, living people or their Pagan names, and I've left out any characters that only have a surname, or truly ridiculous given names. In the second half you'll see a list of names that, to my knowledge, have not been used for witch characters. Please know that this is not a complete list. Wikipedia has an almost complete list you can view here.
Tabitha, Samantha, Endora, Clara, Serena (Bewitched)
Katrina(Katrina Crane, …

Norway's Top 10 Baby Names

Taken from Statistics Norway. I have no clue how/why there are multiple spellings, but I'm assuming they group spellings for each name and then rank them, unlike the U.S. that goes by individual spelling.

*UPDATED
2015 Stats
Girls:
1. Emma
2. Nora/Norah
3. Sara/Sahra/Sarah
4. Sophie/Sofie
5. Olivia
6. Sophia/Sofia
7. Emilie
8. Ella
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10. Maja/Maia/Maya

Boys:
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6. Filip/Fillip, Philip/Phillip
7. Liam
8. Axel/Aksel
9. Emil
10. Oskar/Oscar

Previous:

Girls:
1. Emma
2. Nora/Norah
3. Sara/Sarah/Sahra
4. Sofie/Sophie
5. Linnea/Linea
6. Thea/Tea
7. Maya/Maia/Maja
8. Emilie
9. Ingrid/Ingri
10. Julie

Boys:
1. Emil
2. Lucas/Lukas
3. Mathias/Matias
4. William
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7. Oliver
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Allifair

Alifair Hatfield
The baby name Allifair, alternatively spelled Alifair, Alafair, or Alafare, has a very interesting history. This girl's name suddenly popped into existence in the U.S. around the mid 1800's, with no mention why or how.

Some history buffs may be familiar with the Hatfield-McCoy "New Year's Day" Massacre, in which a long-time hatred between families (including Union vs Confederacy differences) finally escalated into an all-out violent battle. Alifair was the name of Randolph McCoy's daughter, born in 1858, who suffered from Polio as a child but remained productive. During an attack on the McCoy home, Alifair was shot and killed. There was later a legal trial for her murder. Ironically, there was an Alifair Hatfield born in 1873 in Kentucky.

So how did she get her name? There are records of others in 1809, 1815, 1819, 1831, 1870, 1883, 1920 and 1923. 1767 or 1787 seems to be the earliest it was recorded. It could come from Alfher/Alvar/Aelfhere…