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Showing posts from June, 2012

The New Nature Baby Names

Hawthorn berries
I have rounded up a bunch of nature names, some old classics and some that would shock grandma. Feel free to comment with any I might have missed.

Trees:
Acacia
Sequoia
Magnolia
Birch
Pine
Cedar
Timber
Cypress
Maple
Juniper
Linden
Olive
Hickory
Franklin
Rowan
Ash
Aspen
Oak
Poplar
Spruce
Willow
Hazel
Senna
Myrtle
Mimosa
Laurel
Jacaranda
Holly
Cherry
Bay
Cassia
Quince
Banyan
Alder
Balsam
Ornella
Oren
Alona
Ilana
Linnea
Tilia
Elowen

Plants:
Clover
Fern
Bryony/Briony
Thistle
Poinsettia
Ren
Lotus

Flowers:
Jasmine
Jessamine
Rose
Lily
Tigerlily
Freesia
Lilac
Wisteria
Lavender
Celandine
Plumeria
Violet
Amaryllis
Azalea
Blossom
Flower
Petal
Bluebell
Camellia
Dahlia
Tulip
Tansy
Primrose
Marigold
Iris
Forsythia
Gardenia
Hyacinth
Chrysanthe
Amarantha
Poinsettia
Pansy
Poppy
Petunia
Briar Rose

Water:
Cascada/Cascade
Ocean, Oceana
Caspian, Caspienne
Pacifica
Lake
River
Bayou
Cove
Shellina
Isla
Coral
Rain
Bay
Rialta
Laguna
Rio
Kai
Lucerne
Marina
Delta

Herbs & Spices:
Cayenne
Coriander
Basil & Basilia
Sage
Paprika
Pepper
Chamomile
Clove
Lavender
Mint
Saffron
Carawa…

A Lesson in English

I understand that a lot of parents spell names in a way that is supposed to make them easier to pronounce, or to spell the name like it actually sounds (phonetics), but sometimes the end result is even more confusing. Here are a few examples, but know that there are so many more.
Bradyn #815 Unlike Brayden, #37, Bradyn would sound more like Brad-in, as in Bradley. Without that y after the first three letters, it’s not as intended. Izayah #816 With the real name Isaiah being spelled with an S, not to mention how easily recognizable Isaiah is, there’s really no need to spell it like this. It comes across sounding more like Iz-ah-yah. Aaden #797 Why it was necessary to spell it like Aaron, I do not know, considering how hugely popular Aiden is. Then again, there’s Ayden, Aden, Aidyn and Aidan, so why not? Oh, right, because it’s not Aaron.
So, folks, my suggestion is to edit your baby names like you would edit a professional paper, the first step being spelling, the second being comprehensio…

Gwen

Guin and Gwen may share the same root, but the spelling for each nickname is unique. Guin is pronounced gwin, and Gwen, obviously, gwen. It's not Gwenivere for a reason, and is no better than modern smushes.

Why bother arguing over a nickname for Guinevere? While some may say "If you wanted to call her Gwen for short you should've just named her Gwendolyn," I find that each name's history and meaning need to be addressed.

Guinevere, "white phantom," was King Arthur's queen in Arthurian legend. Gwendolen was said to be Queen of the Britons. Both were mentioned in Historia Regum Britanniae by Geoffrey of Monmouth. Mr. Monmouth may have created Gwendolen, spelling it Guendoloena, after being introduced to the Welsh men's name Guendoleu, but regardless of that, Gwendolen is certainly Welsh, meaning "white ring." Gwen means "white, fair" in Welsh, from Proto-Celtic windo, automatically making it a relative of Guinevere. Which came …