Monday, November 17, 2014

Olivine (Peridot)

olivine dreamstime


Olivine (French prn. oh-liv-EEN, American/English prn. OLL-iv-ine), named for its light olive green color, is a mineral formation found under the earth's surface. When this mineral becomes gem quality we call it "peridot," pronounced PER-ih-doe, which is the French word for olivine (thus the French "-doe" ending and not PER-ih-dot). This name is also sometimes taken as a variant of Olivia, which didn't actually mean "olive" in the beginning.

Some types of olivine have been discovered on meteors, the moon, Mars, and further into the depths of the universe. It can also be found naturally all over the world, including a beach in Hawaii.

Peridot is the birthstone for August, and was a loved stone of the ancient Egyptians - it may have even been Cleopatra's favorite. Peridot is one of many similar names the gem has gone by, but most sound very close, such as peridon and peritot.

Olivine is an exceedingly rare baby name for girls in the U.S., with an average of 5 or less girls given the name each year. For most years there is no evidence it has been used, as the SSA guards the info for less than five births.

Sunday, November 16, 2014

The U.S. top 10 in other languages

Girls

1. Sophia - Sofia (which also ranks), Sonya/Sonia/Sonja, Sophie/Sofie/Sophy, Zofia, Zosia, Sohvi, Zsofika, and Zsofia
2. Emma - Ima, Imma, Ema, Ermintrude, Trudy, Irma, & connected to Emily which is #7
3. Olivia - Oliviera, Olivera, Olivette, Olivie
4. Isabella - Isa, Sabella, Belle, Babette, Elisa, Elisavet, Elizabeth (#10) and her variants
5. Ava - Eve, Eva, Hava/Havva, Chava, Evelia, and Evita
6. Mia - as a variant of Maria this one has too many to list, but examples include Moira, Mariska, Mariella, Miriam, Marika, Mirja, Maureen, Mimi, Marietta, Maiken and Mya
7.  Emily - see Emma which is #2, also Aemilia, Amalia, Amelia, Amma/Ama, Emelina, Emmeline, Emilia, Emilita and Emmy
8. Abigail - other than the Biblical Greek variant Abigaia, Abigail really only has spelling variations such as Abigayle and Avigail
9. Madison - meaning "son of Maud," there are no other versions and in other languages Madison is not used on girls as it is a surname only
10. Elizabeth - an exceptional amount of alternate versions to this name, including Elizaveta, Bethan, Elsa, Elise, Isabella (see #4), Zabel, Eliska, Bettina, Betty, Ishbel and Elixabete

Boys

1. Noah - Noe, Noach
2. Liam - see William, #5
3. Jacob - Iago/Yago/Jago, Jamie, James, Yakov, Kuba, Giacomo, Giacobbe, Seamus, Akiba, Akiva, Jacques, Jaumet, and Koppel
4. Mason - a word and occupational surname, so no others
5. William - Wilhelm, Guillermo, Vilko, Wilkin, Liam, Villem, Pim and Wim
6. Ethan - an Old Testament name, no variations in other languages
7. Michael - Miguel, Mikhail,  Misha, Mykolas, Miska, Miksa, Mikko and Mikkel
8. Alexander - Alec, Sander, Olek, Oleksandr, Iskender, Alistair/Alasdair, Sasha, Sawney, Sandro, Ace, Sikandar, and Eskandar
9. Jayden - as an invented name, there are only spelling variants and no international versions
10. Daniel - Danko, Danilo, Taneli, Danut, Daniil, and Deiniol

See behindthename.com for all variants and where they come from

Friday, September 26, 2014

5 ways to get Sadie as a nickname

Sadie, meaning "princess," comes as a nickname from Sarah. Here are five ways you can use Sadie without Sarah.


Sandra, a short form of Alexandra, meaning "man's defender."

Saranda, an Old Greek word meaning "forty."

Sadira, a Persian name meaning "lotus."

Sadia/Sadiya, meaning "lucky" in Arabic.

Saida, pronounced SAY-duh, a variant of Zaida meaning "lucky, fortunate" in Arabic.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Names that can't be spelled wrong

Unless you try really, really hard. It seems like it would take too much effort to turn Nancy into Nansie or Alexander into Alyxzandurr. But these are the kinds of names that most everyone is familiar with and knows how to spell correctly.


Well known Biblical names such as Ruth, Paul, Daniel, Jacob, Hannah, Rachel and Rebecca.

One-syllable names such as Kay, Ace, Belle, Jean, May, Lee, Flynn, Jack and Rue.

Word names such as Peace, Arrow, Fable, Charisma, Hope and Faith.

Plant/natural world names such as Fern, Ruby, Clover, Snow, Pearl, River, and Willow.

Traditional nicknames such as Beth, Sue, Joe, Bob, Tom, Mike, and Ben.

American staples such as Nancy, Carol, Ronald, Gregory, Rose, Marie, Mary and Alexander.

Hollywood classics such as Ava, Audrey, Humphrey, Clark (and Gable), and Shirley.

Top ten names such as Emma, Isabella, Mason, Noah, William, Emily and Elizabeth.

Pop culture names such as Casper, Isis, Leia, Neo, Gatsby and Ziggy.

International favorites such as Gabriella, Nina, Stefan, Maria, Adriana, Elsa, and Marco.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Catkin

catkin barber


Catkin (KAHT-ken, CAT-kin) is a name that, at first, might seem entirely made up for the sole purpose of its cute two-syllable combination. It has a fun and pleasing sound, yet it is a botanical word name (much like Katniss) used to define the flower clusters on some types of trees, including oak, birch, hazel and willow. It came about from the late 16th century Dutch word katteken, meaning "kitten," and probably in reference to the kitten's poofy tail.

Catkin is also a literary name, as seen in Antonia Barber's children's book Catkin, illustrated by P.J. Lynch, and Where is Catkin by Janet Lord. There's another in Cloud Atlas, the book and movie.

If you are into flower fairy art, it is worth checking out Cicely Mary Barker's illustration from 1923 entitled "Hazel Catkin Fairy" from the book Flower Fairies of the Winter. (Hazel Catkin would be a cute combination, as would Willow Catkin or Birch Catkin - any of the tree names on which catkins cluster.)

Catkin is also a Kilcher name, of "Alaska: The Last Frontier" fame. Yule and Ruth are her parents, and she was a Marine. Her daughter is Ecatrina, sons are Anthony and Edwin. Stellavera is another unique name in her family, and recent movie star Q'orianka is also in the family tree.

Catkin remains so rare and hardly ever given that there are no statistics for its usage, although White Pages claims there are at least two - one likely Catkin Kilcher. However, this name is not a one-person name, and, like its botanical flower seeds, needs to be spread!